Pet seizures and how to respond

Just like humans, our pets can also suffer from seizures. Whether caused by a pre-existing condition or seemingly out of the blue, it is important as a pet parent to understand the causes, signs and how to respond.

What is a seizure?

A seizure occurs when an abnormal amount of electrical activity occurs in the brain. This can happen suddenly and cause the body to shake tremendously. The severity and duration of a seizure can vary depending on the cause.

What causes seizures in pets?

It’s valuable to know what can cause seizures in our pets. Seizures are caused by a range of issues including:

  • Consuming poisons or toxins
  • Liver, kidney or other diseases that affect metabolic balance or cause toxin build up
  • Brain tumours
  • Brain trauma or injuries
  • Pre-existing conditions such as Epilepsy

Seizures are likely to occur when there is a change in the brain’s activity. This could be during increased excitement (eg. Feeding) or when your pet is waking up or falling asleep.

How do I know if my pet is having a seizure?

Signs that your pet is having a seizure include:

  • Collapsing
  • Jerking body movements
  • Muscle twitching and a paddling leg motion
  • Sudden unconsciousness
  • Drooling or foaming at the mouth
  • Involuntary urination or defecation

Before and after a seizure, some pets can look dazed, confused and become disorientated.

My pet has a seizure, what should I do?

  1. Remain calm. Try to gently slide your pet away from anything they could injure themselves on.
  2. Avoid their head and mouth. Dogs cannot choke on their own tongue, so don’t need their head supported or anything in their mouth. They may also bite you accidentally if they are touched.
  3. Keep time. Track how long the seizure lasts. If a seizure lasts more than a couple of minutes, it can cause the body to overheat. Keep your pet cool by placing a fan over them and putting cold water on their paws.
  4. Let you dog know that you are there by speaking softly. Again, avoid touching as they may bite.
  5. Contact your vet. Especially if the seizure lasts more than 5 minutes or continues to have them. Prolonged seizures put your pet at risk of developing brain damage.

 If you think your pet is having a seizure, please contact our clinic immediately.

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